8 Last-Minute Weekend Adventures near Brisbane

Natural Attractions

Important COVID-19 Update

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information provided, Visit Moreton Bay Region can not be held responsible for incorrect or misleading information due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Many operators, businesses and listings on this website may be affected – we advise that you contact the relevant businesses or governing bodies to confirm the information is true and accurate before making plans.

Please do the right thing and follow the directions of the Queensland Government.

Important Travel Information

We put together a list of 8 spots for a last-minute weekend adventure. You don’t need to plan, think or worry about these ideas, we’ve done the hard work for you. Read on to find our spots.

#1. North Harbour Heritage Park

Open sunrise to sunset each day of the week, the North Harbour Heritage Park is the perfect last-minute weekend adventure. Situated along the banks of the Caboolture River, the Heritage Park takes you on 1.5km journey through the history of the Moray Fields plantation. With several informative markers along the way, this heritage park will remain as a slice of history preserved forever. You can learn about the old homestead, bunya nuts and the reason for so many bunya trees in the North Harbour area, the cane train, the old dairy, and more.

#2. Bribie Island National Park

From 4WD inland tracks and beach frontage off-road opportunities to beautiful camping spots and fantastic fishing, Bribie Island National Park has it all! Pack your rod and kayak in the back of the fourby and get cruising along the white sandy shores of Bribie Island. Explore the history of the island at Fort Bribie, take a dip in the lagoon, surf the waves or throw in a line.

#3. Bellthorpe National Park

Do you like the thrill of adventure in a four-wheel drive? Head west of Woodford with your bush basher to explore the natural surrounds of Bellthorpe National Park. The three different access points all lead to different tracks from beginner to intermediate. The southern access leads to the Stony Creek Day Use Area, while the eastern route offers the best views – so make sure your passengers have their cameras ready!

The northern access into Bellthorpe National Park is by far the most challenging. Via a steep incline onto the mountain ridge, this track is considered an ‘all weather’ unsealed track that tackles ditches, washouts, boulders and other obstacles.

#4. Thylogale Walking Track

Looking for rainforest hiking paths suitable for all levels of fitness? Thylogale Walking Track is accessible from Jolly’s Lookout and takes you on a 4km journey through the Moreton Bay Region’s very own Mount Mee. A fairly level walk, the track passes through rainforest and crosses a dirt 4WD road before continuing on to end at Boombana Picnic Area, not far from Cafe in the Mountains (previously known as 'Café Boombana').

#5. Bicentennial Trails

The 3.8km circuit of Bribie Island Bicentennial Trails begin at the Bribie Island Community Arts Centre on Sunderland Drive Bribie Island. The sandy track features Banksia, Palm Grove, and Melaleuca Bribie Island walks which branch-off the main circuit giving visitors the chance to enjoy strolls through eucalypt forests, paperbark wetlands, and even wallum heathlands.

#6. Moreton Bay Cycleway

Starting from Scarborough Beach near Pirate Park, you can enjoy a leisurely and scenic cycle along the Redcliffe foreshore thanks to the Moreton Bay Cycleway.

The Redcliffe Peninsula in the Moreton Bay Region comes up trumps for having the best foreshore North Brisbane bike paths in southeast Queensland, along The Moreton Bay Cycleway. From Scarborough Beach to the Ted Smout Memorial Bridge at Clontarf, recreational cyclists can pump their legs along 11kms of shared paths.

The 22km return cycling Brisbane North-side trip with total beach frontage can be an uninterrupted non-stop ride, or include stops for photos, coffee and lunch.

#7. Osprey House

Home to a variety of wildlife and marine animals, the Moreton Bay Region’s very own Osprey House offers great opportunities to explore, discover and learn about both. In a fun and engaging space, kids and adults alike can get back to nature in suburbia’s backyard, with walkways weaving through the bushes along the banks of the North Pine River. There are three main bird watching areas and koalas and kangaroos are not uncommon sightings along the way.

#8. Redcliffe Botanic Gardens

A quiet oasis to read, picnic or enjoy a little natural beauty and serenity, the Redcliffe Botanic Gardens is a quick escape from the noise and clutter of every day life. Stroll through the wheelchair accessible gardens, visit the Herb Garden and admire the beauty of the Chorizema Spring water feature that operates as a natural pond system, becoming a habitat to tree frogs. The Moreton Bay Region Rainforest is also home to more than 250 rainforest species native to the region and more than 1000 bats! If you’re visiting in spring or summer, the Wallum Heathland is blooming with wildflowers that make a breathtaking array of colours.

Discover more natural wonders of the Moreton Bay Region here.

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Looking for more things to do and see? Pop into one of the region's Accredited Visitor Information Centres. The volunteers have a wealth of local knowledge.



Author
Rochelle Lyons

With a background in content writing, social media management and marketing, Rochelle is an avid lover of all things food, book and dog-related, and thinks she's much better at sports than she really is. At only 5'3", she's usually always the shortest among a group of people but will make a point to tell you she's the tallest of all her family members.

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Important COVID-19 Update

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information provided, Visit Moreton Bay Region can not be held responsible for incorrect or misleading information due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Please do the right thing and follow the directions of the Queensland Government.

From 15 May 2020 - you may travel a maximum of 150km from your home for non-contact activity such as exploring national parks, hiking, visiting dog parks, dining-in at restaurants (10 patrons at a time) and more.

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